fbpx

Homeowners Insurance Quote Bushwick NY

Bushwick NY Home Insurance

Coastal Insurance Solutions is a great and trusted company that can advise home owners on insurance in Bushwick, New York. We work with an incredible amount of companies– over 30! Our experience allows us to give you the best rate for your money because we check the market in just one incredibly fast and simple step. We can send our potential customers up to ten proposals as well, all for free, and give you our expert opinion on which company would be best for you by comparing the ratings, prices, and our very own claims experience with them! We know that you as a home owner have a financial investment for your home as well as an emotional investment– your family lives there! Therefore, we aim to give you the best possible price for your money while helping you to protect your assets.
Fill out the information form to find out more or simply give us a call. We’d love to help you get insured.

GET 10 FREE QUOTES FROM TOP RATED
COMPETING INSURANCE COMPANIES

or call us at 718-841-7358

homeowners-insuranceflood-insurancehigh-value-home-insurance

condo-co-op-insuranceumbrella-insuranceauto-insurance

landlord-insurancelife-insurancerenters-insurance

About Bushwick NY:

Bushwick is a rapidly gentrifying working- and middle-class neighborhood in the northern part of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. The neighborhood, formerly Brooklyn’s 18th Ward, is now part of Brooklyn Community Board 4. It is policed by the NYPD’s 83rd Precinct and is represented in the New York City Council as part of Districts 34 and 37.

Bushwick shares a border with Ridgewood, Queens, to the northeast, and is bound by the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Williamsburg to the northwest; East New York and the cemeteries of Highland Park to the southeast; Brownsville to the south; and Bedford-Stuyvesant to the southwest. It is served by ZIP codes 11206, 11207, 11221, and 11237. Bushwick was once an independent town and has undergone various territorial changes throughout its history.

Neighborhoods in New York do not have official boundaries; informal boundaries are often contested, and this has been the case with Bushwick. However, the boundaries of Bushwick are often given as those of Brooklyn Community Board 4, which is delineated by Flushing Avenue on the north, Broadway on the southwest, the border with Queens to the northeast, and the Cemetery of the Evergreens on the southeast.

The industrial area north of Flushing Avenue, east of Bushwick Avenue, and south of Grand Street is also sometimes included in Bushwick, occasionally with the modifier “Industrial Bushwick”.

In 1638, the Dutch West India Company secured a deed from the local Lenape people for the Bushwick area, and Peter Stuyvesant chartered the area in 1661, naming it Boswijck, meaning “little town in the woods” or “heavy woods” in 17th-century Dutch. Its area included the modern-day communities of Bushwick, Williamsburg, and Greenpoint. Bushwick was the last of the original six Dutch towns of Brooklyn to be established within New Netherland.

The community was settled, though unchartered, on February 16, 1660, on a plot of land between the Bushwick and Newtown Creeks by fourteen French and Huguenot settlers, a Dutch translator named Peter Jan De Witt, and one of the original eleven slaves brought to New Netherland, Franciscus the Negro, who had worked his way to freedom. The group centered their settlement on a church located near today’s Bushwick and Metropolitan Avenues. The major thoroughfare was Woodpoint Road, which allowed farmers to bring their goods to the town dock. This original settlement came to be known as Het Dorp by the Dutch, and, later, Bushwick Green by the British. The English would take over the six towns three years later and unite them under Kings County in 1683.

Many of Bushwick’s Dutch records were lost after its annexation by Brooklyn in 1854. Contemporary reports differ on the reason: T. W. Field writes that “a nice functionary of the [Brooklyn] City Hall … contemptuously thrust them into his waste-paper sacks”,while Eugene Armbruster claims that the movable bookcase containing the records “was coveted by some municipal officer, who turned its contents upon the floor”.

At the turn of the 19th century, Bushwick consisted of four villages: Green Point, Bushwick Shore (later known as Williamsburg), Bushwick Green, and Bushwick Crossroads (at the spot where today’s Bushwick Avenue turns southeast at Flushing Avenue).

Bushwick’s first major expansion occurred after it annexed the New Lots of Bushwick, a hilly upland originally claimed by Native Americans in the first treaties they signed with European colonists granting the settlers rights to the lowland on the water. After the second war between the natives and the settlers broke out, the natives fled, leaving the area to be divided among the six towns in Kings County. Bushwick had the prime location to absorb its new tract of land in a contiguous fashion. New Bushwick Lane (Evergreen Avenue), a former Native American trail, was a key thoroughfare for accessing this new tract, which was suitable mostly for potato and cabbage agriculture. This area is bounded roughly by Flushing Avenue to the north and Evergreen Cemetery to the south. In the 1850s, the New Lots of Bushwick area began to develop. References to the town of Bowronville, a new neighborhood contained within the area south of Lafayette Avenue and Stanhope Street, began to appear in the 1850s.

The area known as Bushwick Shore was so called for about 140 years. Bushwick residents called Bushwick Shore “the Strand”, another term for “beach”. Bushwick Creek, in the north, and Cripplebush, a region of thick, boggy shrubland extending from Wallabout Creek to Newtown Creek, in the south and east, cut Bushwick Shore off from the other villages in Bushwick. Farmers and gardeners from the other Bushwick villages sent their goods to Bushwick Shore to be ferried to New York City for sale at a market located at the present-day Grand Street. Bushwick Shore’s favorable location close to New York City led to the creation of several farming developments. Originally a 13-acre (53,000 m2) development within Bushwick Shore, Williamsburgh rapidly expanded during the first half of the 19th century and eventually seceded from Bushwick to form its own independent city in 1852. Both Bushwick and Williamsburgh were annexed to the City of Brooklyn in 1854.

Need assistance now?

Give us a call:
(631) 782-3175